Archive for March, 2011

RadNet Database

29Mar11

From the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s description of the RadNet database, which has its roots in the Eisenhower Executive Order 10831 (August 14, 1959), which established the Federal Radiation Council: The RadNet searchable database contains 23 years of environmental radiation monitoring data from all fifty states and U.S. territories and 40 years of measurements of […]


I recently discovered a copy of Our Atomic World in my library. Our Atomic World was authored by C. (Claude) Jackson Craven for the Atomic Energy Commission (1963, 1964, revised). The publication is an optimistic look at the atom featuring an historical overview of atomic research and development, with an appeal for nuclear energy “needed for […]


I can’t embed USTREAM video on WordPress for some reason, so here are the links to the translated Citizens Nuclear Information Center (CNIC) press conferences: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/13530404 http://www.ustream.tv/channel/cnic-news http://www.cnic.jp/english/topics/safety/earthquake/fukushima.html


TMI & Chernobyl

14Mar11

In the academic literature, it’s widely held that the disasters at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl are failures in risk communication. It’s useful to revisit these cases as the international media (ABC News & BBC as examples) likens Fukushima-Daiichi reactor problems to TMI (a partial core meltdown) and Chernobyl (continuing public health and environmental […]


As I digest media accounts of the nuclear reactor situation in Japan, it seems to me the U.S. media has a teachable moment at hand. Teachable, as I intend here, means the U.S. media thoughtfully lead the debate on nuclear power and harm in the same way as perhaps Life magazine (May 16, 1949 “The […]


Historically, censorship has been employed by the U.S. government as a shield to restrict specific categories of information during war. For example, the Office of Censorship’s Code of Wartime Practices (1945) requested that publishers and broadcasters refrain from communicating information on weapons, “military intelligence,” and casualties during WWII.  Nuclear weapons fell under this type of […]


Ran across this “Exxon film” over at Internet Archive today.  One of the claims made in the film is that nuclear power is a “proven alternative” to the use of coal and oil for energy production.